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Glyndebourne Festival

A world-leading opera house in the heart of the Sussex countryside.

Sussex Downs, cercano a Lewes, East Sussex View Address
1200 people
Gus Christie View Director
1934
Stephen Langridge View Art director
Opera
Glyndebourne Festival
Jules Massenet
John Wilson, Fiona Shaw, Fiona Dunn

With its combination of enchanting love story and broad, burlesque comedy, Cendrillon is one of the great operatic fairy tales – a Cinderella that looks back to Charles Perrault’s original story in all its richness and ambiguity. Massenet’s sensuous belle époque fairy tale is gilded with lavish orchestral textures and glittering vocal writing, drawing on everything from baroque dances to Wagner-inspired chromaticism to bring its story to colourful life, conjuring a world of infinite musical and emotional variety.

 

Fiona Shaw’s original Tour production makes its Festival debut here, re-directed by Fiona Dunn and conducted by John Wilson, with a cast led by Glyndebourne favourites Danielle de Niese as Cendrillon and Kate Lindsey as her Prince.

 

With the collaboration of Naxos

Opera
Glyndebourne Festival
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Ryan Wigglesworth, Barbe & Doucet

One of Mozart’s most enchanting works, Die Zauberflöte is a fairy tale that uses familiar archetypes to ask provocative and difficult questions about religion, the nature of power, the bonds of family, and of course love. Premiered just months before Mozart’s death, Die Zauberflöte in many ways represents a new departure for the composer. Catching the spirit of revolution in the air, Mozart turned his attention for the first time from court opera to popular opera, writing this singspiel (‘sung-play’) for a new and much broader audience.

 

Celebrated Canadian directing duo Barbe & Doucet make both their British and Glyndebourne debuts here with their new Die Zauberflöte, a veritable “theatrical feast of eccentricity.” (The Guardian). Ryan Wigglesworth conducts an outstanding cast including Russian soprano Sofia Fomina as Pamina, David Portillo as her beloved Tamino, Brindley Sherratt as Sarastro, and the ebullient Björn Bürger as Papageno.

 

Con la colaboración de Naxos

Opera
Glyndebourne Festival
Brett Dean
Vladimir Jurowski, Neil Armfield

The world premiere recording of Brett Dean’s new opera based on Shakespeare’s best-known tragedy: To be, or not to be. This is Hamlet’s dilemma, and the essence of Shakespeare’s most famous and arguably greatest work, given new life in operatic form in this original Glyndebourne commission. Thoughts of murder and revenge drive Hamlet when he learns that it was his uncle Claudius who killed his father, the King of Denmark, then seized his father’s crown and wife.

 

But Hamlet’s vengeance vies with the question: is suicide a morally valid deed in an unbearably painful world? Dean’s colourful, energetic, witty and richly lyrical music expertly captures the modernity of Shakespeare’s timeless tale, while also exploiting the traditional operatic elements of arias, ensembles and choruses. Matthew Jocelyn’s inspired libretto is pure Shakespeare, adhering to the Bard’s narrative thread but abridging, reconfiguring and interweaving it into motifs that highlight the main dramatic themes: death, madness, the impossibility of certainty and the complexities of action.

 

With the collaboration of Naxos

Opera
Glyndebourne Festival
Hector Berlioz
Antonello Manacorda, Laurent Pelly

Through the eye of French director Laurent Pelly this expression of Berlioz’s undying admiration for the Bard — his adaptation of Much Ado about Nothing as an opéra comique — becomes "an elegant treatise on love and music designed in shades of grey with 50s-era costumes" (Sunday Express ★★★★).

 

Housed by designer Barbara de Limburg in a series of oversized boxes, it’s "terribly chic, terribly pretty" (The Spectator).

 

Soaring over the warmly graceful playing of the London Philharmonic’, Paul Appleby sings ‘attractively’ as Bénédict and Stéphanie d’Oustrac "makes a marvellously wiry and fiery Béatrice, singing with charm and acting with gusto" (The Telegraph).

 

With the collaboration of Naxos